August 2005

Needs More Weed Killer

by Alan Rapp on August 31, 2005

in Movie Reviews 

I’m sure there are people that are going to love this film; I’m not one of them.  Even the strong pefromances from the two leads can’t quite save The Constant Gardener from being both boring and predictable – two words you don’t want to describe a dramatic thriller.

The Constant Gardener
2 Stars

Some novels can be adapted to screen successfully and some cannot.  The Constant Gardener belongs in the second category.  The structure for the movie might work in a novel but here the story just gets bogged down.  The film is oddly spliced together with flashbacks in an attempt to try and make the obvious seem murky and mysterious.  Too bad the end result just makes it look lame.  It’s sad such great leading performances were wasted on such a bad script.

The film begins with the discovery of the body of Tessa Quayle (Rachel Weisz) who has been brutally murdered in the Kenyan countryside.  From there the film moves through flashbacks of Tessa’s life mixed with her husband Justin’s (Ralph Fiennes) attempt to discover why she was killed and what became of her companion Arnold (Hubert Kounde) who has disappeared.  Unwilling to accept the official explanation of Tessa’s death being a result of an affair between Tessa and Arnold who must have killed her in a passionate rage, Justin decides to conduct his own investigation and learns that Tessa’s death wasn’t caused by anything so simple.

Let’s start out with the perfromances which are outstanding.  Fiennes is well chosen for the bitter and remorseful character who will stop at nothing to discover the truth.  Weisz who we only see in flashbacks though is the real heart of the film.  Her character is the only one from the film that is complex and three dimensional and whose feelings and actions have consequences not just to herself but to her husband and the world around her.

Aside from the acting the films problems are numerous.  First off the flashbacks reveal too much of Tessa’s character for the audience not to realize what she really died for and the cause itself can be easily deduced very early in the film.  Second the scenes involving the meeting of the two seem to suggest a relationship of convience which would hardly justify Justin’s odyssey later in the film.  Third the scenes of Tessa’s possible infedelities don’t work because the relationship with Justin isn’t developed far enough and the film is too cavalier in giving away more information than is necessary.  And finally the choice in editing makes the film too helter skielter.  It was obviously chosen to try and hide the extremely simple answer to the “mystery” of Tessa’s death, but not only does it not succeed in covering the truth it only detaches the viewer from the film.

The movie was adapted from the novel by John le Carre and I don’t doubt that the story might make a very good novel where such information and clues can be spaced out over chapters.  In a compacted theatrical version the mystery just doesn’t work.  If Justin knew anything about his wife he would be easily able to deduce what happened to her, but the film tries to make Justin totally oblivious to who his wife was and what she was up to.  The result becomes a series of flashbacks between the two where we learn everything about Tessa while Justin stands there totally oblivous.  If he’s really that dense, how’s he suppossed to solve her murder?

The film just doesn’t work as a thriller because the structure continually takes the viewer out of the story.  The film doesn’t work as a mystery because the reasons for the death can easily be deduced just by learning a fraction of who Tessa was.  The drama doesn’t work because neither the love story nor Tessa’s murder seem enough to push the action of the film that develops into a weak Bourne Identity as Justin becomes an expert on covert tatics, surveillance, and digging for the truth (none of which are needed for this very simple plot).  The film tries every trick it can using red herrings, odd editing, and plot contivances to hide what is essentially rather obvious.

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Writings of a B Movie Star

by Alan Rapp on August 29, 2005

in Uncategorized

I was lucky enough to be on a stop for the Make Love the Bruce Campbell Way book tour.  Being the naturally curious sort, I went out and grabbed both books to sneak a peek at how Bruce Campbell’s mind works.  Both are worthy of some serious, well not too serious,  readin’!

Make Love the Bruce Campbell Way / If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B Movie Star
4 Stars

I was lucky enough to be on a stop for the Make Love the Bruce Campbell Way book tour.  Being the naturally curious sort, I went out and grabbed both books to sneak a peek at how Bruce Campbell’s mind works.  His first book is the insightful autobiography If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B Movie Actor which tells the story of his childhood and his early work on films (Evil Dead) and television (Briscoe County, Jr.).  His new novel Make Love the Bruce Campbell Way effectively demonstrates why Campbell hasn’t worked on more A-list projects.  Both are worthy of some serious, well not too serious,  readin’!

Shhh…nobody tell Nichols, Gere or Zellweger!

Make Love the Bruce Campbell Way

Campbell’s new book is a self deprecating novel about his chance of getting out of B movies and moving onto the A-list.  Although many of the characters in the book are real this is a book of fiction, or as our author states, “everything in this book actually happened, except for all the stuff that didn’t.”  Our lead character Bruce Campbell is given an Oscar caliber supporting role in the new Mike Nichols film Let’s Make Love!  Problems start to arise on the project when despite his best efforts Campbell begins to slowly influence the movie, its director, and its stars with his B movie sensibilities.  He gets Richard Gere interested in doing his own stunt work, he gives some rather humorous suggestions to Rene Zellweger and the costume director, and turns Mike Nichols’ dramatic project into an overspending, cheesy, special effect nightmare of a movie.  The studio of course blames all of this on our hero infecting the project with a “B movie virus.”

Any book that makes me laugh out loud I have to endorse.  The most comical scenes involve Campbell’s preparation and research for his character Foyl Whipple.  A stint as a doorman (Foyl’s profession) is not only disastrous but gets the unwanted attention of the US Secret Service.  Learning about relationships and how to give advice leads him into Lester Shankwater’s van which produces some of the funniest lines of the book as we watch how not to pick up women.  We also get a look at the gentlemen of the South, a stint as a wedding planner, an attack on the movie studio, and some hilarious interaction between Campbell and his co-stars Richard Gere and Rene Zellweger.

Finally an autobiography worth reading!

If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B Movie Actor

Usually in biographies of actors you get tales of studying in college or with renowned theatrical types.  What makes If Chins Could Kill so unique is it’s about an average guy who grew up enjoying film and theater, found friends who had similar interests, and set out to make a career as a working actor and would eventually become the B movie king.  None of that method bullshit here.  Campbell gives us some terrific memories of growing up in Detroit and about his early attempts into the world of Super 8mm films such as It’s Murder and The Happy Valley Kid.  He also stops from time to time to allow others to share their remembrances about specific events, including Sam Raimi.  Not too much mind you, this is his book after all; let those other guys get their own book deals!

We get a look at the torturous process of making Evil Dead, which after you read you may wonder how it ever got finished, a look at the sequels and Campbell’s work since then on projects such as Brisco County, Jr. and The Hudsucker Proxy.  For me though the best parts of the book were the anecdotes about his experiences and friendships made through growing up and Detroit and his early filmmaking days.  My favorite of these has to be the gag Campbell plays on his old friend David Goodman that involves a lemon of a car, a mechanic, a few phone calls, and the US Department of Justice.  Folks, friendship can be torture as Campbell himself learned from the evil glee Sam Raimi gets putting him, his friend, in some very hazardous situations while filming.

 

I’d recommend both of these books to fans of Bruce Campbell and fans of movies in general.  The novel is a very funny take on the difference between the A-list and B movies.  The autobiography I would also recommend to anyone interested in how to raise money, make, and market a movie or just how to make some great looking fake blood.  If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B Movie Actor is available in trade paperback for $13.95 and Make Love the Bruce Campbell Way is available in Hardcover for $23.95.  So what are ya’ waiting for already?  Get your butts to the bookstore and pick them up, or I might have to get out my Boomstick!

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So What’s the Name of Your Act?

by December Lambeth on August 26, 2005

in Movie Reviews 

I feel so dirty for laughing at such a perverse and morally wrong joke. There has been and will be nothing that will ever top this completely disgusting nasty 86-minute laugh off. This film tests every ounce of moral standing you may have in you. The Aristocrats pushes the envelope of dirty gross out humor and makes you want more more more, it is one filthy joke that never ends

The Aristocrats
4 Stars

I feel so dirty for laughing at such a perverse and morally wrong joke. There has been and will be nothing that will ever top this completely disgusting nasty 86-minute laugh off. This film tests every ounce of moral standing you may have in you. The Aristocrats pushes the envelope of dirty gross out humor and makes you want more more more, it is one filthy joke that never ends.

The Aristocrats documents an inside joke that has been passed down from comedian to comedian through out history, like a treasured secret. It starts the same way, “A man walks into a talent agent’s office with his family and says, have I got an act for you and the agent replies, so what do you do?” From that point on it is complete improvisation, usually soaked in shit, pee, incest, vomit, blood and any other possibly horrid thing you could imagine. Each comedian spoon-feeds his or her version of the joke and with each ending it gets funnier and funnier.

The finale, the end of the joke is the agent asking, “So what’s the name of your act?” and the comedian says, “The Aristocrats”. This film is not for the week of heart and if you have a timid demeanor then stay far away, but if you know how to take a joke, GO SEE IT, GO SEE IT NOW!

Be sure to pay close attention to a few outstanding performances by Bob Saget, Gilbert Gottfried, and Sarah Silverman.

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The Grim Brothers Grimm

by December Lambeth on August 26, 2005

in Movie Reviews 

Director Terry Gilliam (Time Bandits, Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas, & The Fisher King) has lost his touch after 7 years. Fans will be amused, but a bit disappointed. Given, The Brothers Grimm, is quite eye catching and has some since of humor accompanied with some very very dark moments. When I say dark moments I mean, a little fluffy kitten in a meat grinder and the skinning of a rabbit in detail, all done with a twisted amount of humor of course. But Terry doesn’t give enough, maybe it has to do with being frustrated with corporate meddling and not having the freedom to really express himself.

The Brothers Grimm
1 & 1/2 Stars

Director Terry Gilliam (Time Bandits, Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas, & The Fisher King) has lost his touch after 7 years. Fans will be amused, but a bit disappointed. Given, The Brothers Grimm, is quite eye catching and has some since of humor accompanied with some very very dark moments. When I say dark moments I mean, a little fluffy kitten in a meat grinder and the skinning of a rabbit in detail, all done with a twisted amount of humor of course. But Terry doesn’t give enough, maybe it has to do with being frustrated with corporate meddling and not having the freedom to really express himself.

Set in early 18th century French occupied Germany, The Brothers Grimm follows the tale of 2 hoaxer brothers who go from town to town peddling their ghostbusting talents. Will Grimm (Matt Damon) and Jake Grimm (Heath Ledger) find themselves busted red handed by General Delatombe (Jonathan Pryce) and forced to solve a town’s missing children problem. The General believes that 2 conmen like the brothers are wreaking havoc on the tiny village of Marbaden and threatens Will and Jake’s life to bring this hoax to a stop. Accompanied by the General’s second in command, crazy Cavaldi (Peter Stormare) and enlisting the help of a very beautiful local peasant girl, Angelika (Lena Headey), they head into the enchanted forest. Not finding any pulleys or springboards, the brothers start to question how this is a con and start to believe that the forest has been cursed. Running for safety only to be forced back into the evil place by General Delatombe and his guards to find Little Red Riding Hood and Gretal, plus ten other girls who had been kidnapped, all used to remove the curse of the evil Mirror Queen (Monica Bellucci).

As the story takes shape, Jake spends his time jotting down notes and parts of the story always kept in check by his lady killer brother Will. Will is consistently reminding Jake that their is no such thing as magic beans and to keep his feet on the ground and his head out of the clouds. Jake has the opportunity at the end to prove to his overbearing unbelieving brother that fairy tales can end happily ever after and all it takes is one kiss from true love.

The Brothers Grimm has a set that compares closely to Tim Burton’s Sleepy Hollow, but has some very poor CGI moments. Luckily the film’s saving grace are the 2 main characters, except for their inability to keep up with their accents, Matt & Heath play off each other brilliantly. It’s sad to say that Terry Gilliam has grown a little soft over the years; I would have loved to see a little Monty Python flair. Overall it’s a fun watch and if you go in with low expectations or none at all The Brothers Grimm will work for you too.

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Four Brothers

by December Lambeth on August 26, 2005

in Movie Reviews 

Four Brothers has energy, action, gunfights, street thugs, stunts, revenge and a very charismatic cast of four who get along like they may actually be blood brothers. Why the feelings of mild disappointment, the film needed just a little more girth behind it. Director John Singleton (“Boyz N the Hood) did his job, he pulled off all the gritty tension and street smarts that the audience could ever expect to see, but Four Brothers needed something else. It’s the storyline, too simpleton, not enough intrigue and true capacity for why their adopted mother, Evelyn Mercer (Fionnula Flanagon), was set up for an execution. It wasn’t convincing enough, that this sweet old woman who everybody in the neighborhood adored, would be shot over a little ego. This took accreditation away from Victor Sweet (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a pretend to be on the edge hot shot thug, that turned out to be nothing more than an ego crazed looser. However, if you are out to see some true grit old western style Detroit action, then Four Brothers is the film to see.

Four Brothers
2 & 1/2 Stars

Four Brothers has energy, action, gunfights, street thugs, stunts, revenge and a very charismatic cast of four who get along like they may actually be blood brothers. Why the feelings of mild disappointment, the film needed just a little more girth behind it. Director John Singleton (“Boyz N the Hood) did his job, he pulled off all the gritty tension and street smarts that the audience could ever expect to see, but Four Brothers needed something else. It’s the storyline, too simpleton, not enough intrigue and true capacity for why their adopted mother, Evelyn Mercer (Fionnula Flanagon), was set up for an execution. It wasn’t convincing enough, that this sweet old woman who everybody in the neighborhood adored, would be shot over a little ego. This took accreditation away from Victor Sweet (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a pretend to be on the edge hot shot thug, that turned out to be nothing more than an ego crazed looser. However, if you are out to see some true grit old western style Detroit action, then Four Brothers is the film to see.

After the death of their adopted mother, the Mercer brothers go out to seek revenge and save the memory of the tough old bird. She took in Bobby (Mark Wahlberg), Angel (Tyrese Gibson), Jeremiah (Andre Benjamin) and Jack (Garrett Hedlund) after nobody else would adopt the rough and rowdy bunch. If it weren’t for Evelyn’s ability to crack the whip and straighten out four thugs, they would have ended up dead or in jail. The commentary between her and the four boys was awesome; she would slap them in the face with words about how they ate at the table, comparing tattoos and strong hand respect for others and themselves. After her funeral, hothead Bobby took the lead to find out why their mother had been shot. Off to investigate what Detroit police officers Lt Green (Terrence Howard) and Detective Fowler (Josh Charles) wasn’t able to put together with a map and their fingers on the spot, Bobby, Angel, and Jack started by watching the grocer’s video of the incident. Noticing that the thug had money in hand and the robbery was an obvious cover up, they headed after the source of it all. Knowing the streets and getting away with gang like executions, the boys never suffered any kind of consequences for their actions besides a few slaps from a short interrogation and the loss of one of their posse.

An issue of trust came about when they found out the family man of the group, Jeremiah, may have been at fault for her death. He wouldn’t deal with Victor Sweet on starting up a business, so Victor, with a city official in his pocket, had Jeremiah shut down. To keep his family safe, he had to take out his mother’s life insurance to pay the thug off and this is where Angel caught him red handed. Finding it to be all a misunderstanding, the boys join efforts for one last show down out on a lake of ice. Let’s just say that Victor ends up swimming with the fishes, and all who were involved got their just do.

Four Brothers is an action packed adventure with old time stunts not counting on CGI and a cast that rocks. What sums this film up best is the car chase, a tense ride through a blizzard that blinds and sparks flying from the rims of the car, the boys get the guys in the end and walk away to start a new life by rebuilding mom’s house.

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The Corpse Bride New Site

by December Lambeth on August 26, 2005

in Film News & Trailers

Tim Burton’s new adventure, The Corpse Bride , with Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter releases this September 23rd, but for those of you who are anxious to see an early preview then check out the new flash site. 

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A Valiant Effort at Mediocrity

by Alan Rapp on August 19, 2005

in Movie Reviews 

Do you have an obsession with how pigeons were used during World War II?  Yeah, me neither.  Valiant is a fine little film for senior citizens who like animated features with talking birds; unless that’s you you’d probably do better with a Disney straight to video release.

Valiant
2 Stars

As the credits rolled I wondered, not for the first time, who exactly this film was made for.  It seems odd to think that Disney designed an animated feature specifically with senior citizens in mind, seeing how catering to such a small niche market doesn’t exactly mesh with the conglomerate that bought ABC and opened Euro-Disney.  This would be a good film for grandparents who lived during WWII to take their grandchildren to and talk about afterwards; sadly the rest of us will end up feeling more than a little bored.

A War Movie For Kids?  Disney Style???

The year is 1944 and pigeons are being used to relay vital messages from the Allied Command to the forces deployed in the field.  The Axis Powers have deployed hawks to capture the pigeons led by Von Talon (Tim Curry).  Valiant (Ewan McGregor) is a young undersized pigeon who feels the need to serve his country and enlists.  His platoon contains the “John Canyesque” Bugsy (Rick Gervais), the nerdy Lofty (Pip Torrens), and the musclebrain twins Tailfeather (Dan Roberts) and Toughwood (Brian Lonsdale).  Our heroes are trained and sent of with the heroic Gutsy (Hugh Laurie) on their first mission to deliver messages vital to the war effort.

The scenes of the training are much what you’d expect from a Disney version of movies like Stripes.  Not much new or of any interest; pigeon and hawk alike are stockpile characters stolen from other flicks.  The hawks themselves are fine, but they aren’t given the menace of previous Disney villains.  Instead they are used more for comic relief, especially Talon’s two helpers (Michael Schlingmann and Rik Mayall), which makes taking them seriously as a threat is almost impossible.  Even when Valiant and his comrades are put into what should be dangerous situations we never really feel they are in any serious danger.  It’s bad when you end up rooting for the Nazis, but we simply don’t care whether these characters live or die and I will admit after an hour of this tedious story I was gleefully hoping for a hawk to make himself a pigeon sandwich.

The movie starts out promising with a British pigeon black and white propaganda film and the capture of Mercury (John Cleese).  Cleese has some of the films best lines as a P.O.W. captured and interrogated by the hawks.  Too bad his part is so small; his wit could have been used in other scenes.  The story keeps you vaguely interested as it seems to promise better things to come.  We are shown several moments where we expect the film to takeoff and fly, but this bird never really gets off the ground.

 

It seems odd that this was released in theaters; it has the feel of recent Disney straight to video releases.  The movie just never reaches the level you would expect from a Disney film.  While I applaud the studio for making a different type of animated feature, the result is less than what one would have hoped for.  Most younger children aren’t going to get the gist of the film without detailed explanation, adolescents will avoid it like the plague, and most adults under sixty will be bored out of their minds.  Sadly, it was made about four decades too late to have any cultural interest other than in Britain, where I expect it will find some modest success.  Although not terrible, I can’t think such a mediocre movie was what such a great cast was assembled to produce.  Too bad a group of actors like this was wasted on this turkey.

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Frank Miller’s Sin City

by Alan Rapp on August 19, 2005

in DVD Reviews 

  • Title: Sin City
  • IMDB: link

Walk down the right back alley in Sin City, and you can find anything…

It might seem strange to call a movie as violent and bloody as Sin City beautiful but no other word quite fits.  After all the movie vividly contains decapitation, canibalism, castration, severed limbs, truckloads of guns and explosions, and blood in all different shades and colors.  It’s a film noir overflowing with deceit, treachery, torture, murder and death.  Yet somehow this is all captured as originally drawn by Frank Miller and transferred so lovingly onto screen that one can not help but sit back with wonder and appreciation.  Beautiful?  ‘Bet your ass!

The plot of the film blends three main stories, with one or two small ones,  compiled from Frank Miller’s successful Sin City graphic novels.  We get three hardboiled protagonists in the sinful setting of Basin City. 

Hardigan (Bruce Willis) is one honest cop in a city owned by the crooks.  On his last day on the job he saves 11 year old skinny little Nancy Callahan (played as an adult by Jessica Alba) from a senator’s demented son (Nick Stahl) only to be shot by his partner and put in prison for Junior’s crimes. 

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The grand daddy of all wise guy films.
Stick and move, Bobby, stick and move.

Robert DeNiro bobs, weaves, curses, spits and earns a Best Actor Oscar in Martin Scorsese’s “Raging Bull”, playing prizefighter Jake La Motta.
Released in 1980, it’s a brutal and beautiful film that probably wouldn’t get past the pitch stage today let alone be filmed. I can just see Scorsese at the lunch meeting, on the edge of his chair and spilling salad all over the table: “This guy was middleweight champ in ’49. Sure, no one outside The Bronx has heard of him, but he knocked Sugar Ray Robinson on his ass! We’ll shoot it in black and white. Every other word will be diry, and Joe Pesci…Who’s Joe Pesci?! So, he’s an unknown NOW, but you just wait…He’ll say, ‘Yo’ mutha sucks fuckin’ BIG fuckin’ ELEPHANT DICKS!'”
Yet it was made. And even more unbelievably it was nominated for Best Picture. But that isn’t saying much considering the Academy gave the award to “Ordinary People”.
The 2 disc collector’s edition is essential for anyone who loves “GoodFellas” and “The Sopranos” because this is the granddaddy of all modern day wiseguy films and your girlfriend will fall asleep halfway through it. In addition to mini-documentaries on the making of the film, the special features include the theatrical trailer, which, at the time, was like no other trailer I’d ever seen. In fact, I went to see the film when it was released on the strength of the trailer. There was no cheesy narration, just a few scenes with dialogue followed by images of the film set to the opening Intermezzo. I forgot what movie my girlfriend and I went to see when I first saw the trailer (I think it was ‘Ordinary People’), but after it was over, there were none of the usual murmurs from the crowd, just silence. A few people looked at each other, as if saying, “What the hell was THAT!?!?!”
I saw the film at least twenty times after it was released. It was a mesmerizing roller-coaster ride, rising with the ferocious fight scenes, both in the ring at at home, levelling out with Michael Chapman’s beautifully shot slow motion images, and sinking to the gritty and just downright depressing end of La Motta’s fight career, where it blurs to his stint as a nightclub owner and entertainer and his second term in prison. Sure, the film was famous for De Niro’s gaining fifty pounds to play La Motta in retirement, but it’s the sinewy, hunched over, stick and move, stick and move De Niro that stands out after all these years. (Here’s what I think is a sad comment on De Niro’s career: I was at Blockbuster recently and two college women were browsing through Drama and one of them commented: “I just can’t see Robert De Niro as a bad guy.”)
So buy, rent or steal this collector’s edition and watch Joe Pesci become a star, watch De Niro play tony Soprano years before that character was even a gleam in David Chase’s eye, and try to figure out where you’ve seen that guy who plays Mob Boss Tommy Como…
It’s ‘Coach’ in the TV Sitcom “Cheers”.

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Primo Disgustingo

by Tim Dodd on August 18, 2005

in Uncategorized

Hit your man over the head and EAT A HAMBURGER!!!

Vittorio bathes his reptilian spawn

What a sick movie.
That’s pretty much all I could think of while watching Strand Releasing’s newest piece of European DVD trash that provides its viewers with many of those primal exploitation elements we all know and love but offers them in a way that is, to quote one of my favorite Stooges songs, NO FUN.
This latest bit of cinematic excrement is Matteo Garrone’s Primo Amore, a film that somehow tries to romanticize extreme control, sick psychological problems, dangerous eating disorders, and emotional violence. Sure, the film’s press release claims that it is “a cautionary tale,” but after watching it I’m pretty convinced that this movie exists just to titillate some sick suckers out there who love to see nude ladies romping around with their ribs poking out from under their pasty white emaciated skin.
The plot of this wacky film is the kind that makes me want to seal all the windows, turn on the gas, and watch The Cosby Show until my eyes grow heavy with peaceful, eternal sleep. It goes a little somethin’ like this: Vittorio (Vitaliano Trevisan) is a bald, older guy who meets young, pretty Sonia (Michela Cescon) through a personal ad and immediately tells her that she’s fat. Desperate for love and companionship, Sonia begins a relationship with Vittorio, who immediately starts controlling her by making her go on a diet.
Sonia isn’t fat in the least, but Vittorio has some screws loose in his big melon head and he apparently wants her to be like all of the pasty white toothpick women who entertain us in many excellent movies and television shows. Sonia gets sucked into the whole deal, happily restricting her intake of food and charting her progress/decline on a chart. Well, a few pounds isn’t enough for Vittorio, and as he makes her lose more and more weight, both go totally insane and their already unhealthy relationship becomes positively diabolical.
I’m at times a “glass half full” kinda guy, so I’ll give you a few positives on this dungheap. The acting is good, the dialogue is competently written, and there are some striking images found throughout the film. Sonia’s transformation from normal to ultra-thin is convincingly executed and I give mad props to Michela Cescon for going on whatever extreme diet she had to go on in order to make this change. But honey, was it all really worth it?
My main problem with this movie is that it’s just not very believable that the young, attractive Sonia would go through all of this for Vittorio, who’s dull, lacks charisma, and is actually a dick. I know that many women get themselves into abusive relationships that they can’t pull themselves out of, so perhaps my view is naive. Still, it just doesn’t make a lot of sense. The press release states that it is based on a true story, so I guess that the truth really is stranger than fiction… and it’s also proof that the truth doesn’t necessarily make for a good movie.
So you wanna make a movie about obsessive love that serves as a cautionary tale? Make a self-help video, not a feature film that passes itself as entertainment. However, if you’re the kind of person that sees the words “Obsessive Love, Sexual Fixation, Dieting to the Extreme!” and goes “Wow! That’s exactly what I need!”, then by all means, go rent Primo Amore. Just keep your sick-shit-lovin’ ass the hell away from me.
Please.

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