Comics

Samurai Jack #7

by Alan Rapp on April 14, 2014

in Comics

Samurai Jack #7With Samurai Jack and the Scotsman both turned into females by the Leprechauns the pair’s two-issue gender-bending adventures continue as Samurai Jacqueline and the Scotswoman seek to complete their bargain with the devious imps and confront the giant Cuhullin the Cruel.

Only after confronting the massive creature in battle do Jack and the Scotsman uncover just how much they’ve been played by the evil imps and decide to do what they can to set things right. With the spell broken due to the giant’s wailing breaking the music of the curse (which is only slightly less awkward than it sounds), the restored Jack and Scotsman come up with a plan to help Cuhullin and teach the Leprechauns a much-deserved lesson.

Available in a cute variant cover by Agnes Garbowska, Samurai Jack #7 wraps up the bizarre adventure that despite its unique set-up stays true to the style and themes of the original cartoon. Worth a look.

[IDW, $3.99]

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All-New X-Men #25

by Alan Rapp on April 14, 2014

in Comics

All-New X-Men #25The “monumental” 25th issue of All-New X-Men feels much more like a forgettable annual rather than an important issue of an ongoing comic. Centered around the Beast‘s conversations with an over-talkative Watcher, the framework is a relatively weak excuse to bring in a variety of artists to give takes on their version of various X-Men characters in the present and possible futures (including Magik as Sorceress Supreme) all put in jeopardy by McCoy’s decision to bring the younger versions of his friends into the present.

Don’t get me wrong, there’s some very nice artwork here (highlighted for me by Bruce Timm’s showcasing Jean Grey in her various forms), some of it quite funny, but as a fan of the original idea of The Watcher as a silent observer I’m less than satisfied with this verbose version that even goes so far as to insult the X-Man after speaking his mind. For such a momentous issue All New X-Men #25 can easily be skipped by those not willing to pay $5 for a story that doesn’t do much of anything to further ongoing stories and whose absence won’t be felt going forward if you choose not to read it. Hit-and-Miss.

[Marvel, $4.99]

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Worlds’ Finest #22

by Alan Rapp on April 12, 2014

in Comics

Worlds' Finest #22With “First Contact” finished, the Huntress and Power Girl are left to bicker between themselves whether the alternate Earth (with an evil Superman) they caught a glimpse of before Helena destroyed the portal was actually their home.

After the two dispatch a group of mercenaries who have their own plans for the New Gammora technology, the comic splits the pair up for Huntress to search for answers and Karen Starr, with her empire now firmly back under her control, to sell it all off to fund the trip home.

As has been the custom of the comic, Worlds’ Finest #22 also throws in some flashbacks as well featuring the Huntress’ first solo mission in the new Earth that doesn’t exactly go as planned (but does allow her the opportunity to dropkick a wolf).

Tying up the loose ends of the crossover and returning the the early structure of the comic, the latest issue gets the heroines back on track (although hopefully not any closer to going home as I’d hate to see them leave for the less interesting Earth-2). Worth a look.

[DC, $2.99]

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Green Hornet #11

by Alan Rapp on April 11, 2014

in Comics

Green Hornet #11Reunited with Kato, successfully taking down The Voice, putting down a pathetic imposter, and grabbing control as the new head of organized crime, everything is finally going according to the Green Hornet‘s plan. And that’s when things begin to fall apart because of a monster of the vigilante’s own making.

Gerald Dugan‘s life continues its downward spiral as the once-honest cop the Hornet corrupted gets further and further out of control when he decides to kidnap the daughter of Fulton and eventually murder her right in front of the Green Hornet to prove his loyalty to the city’s new crime boss.

Aside from continued dark turn of Dugan, Green Hornet #11 also offers Lenore Case to get into the action (in costume), which she enjoys a little too much for Britt Reid’s comfort. How both characters’ roles play out should be fun to watch over the series’ final two issues. Worth a look.

[Dynamite Entertainment, $3.99]

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Moon Knight #2

by Alan Rapp on April 10, 2014

in Comics

Moon Knight #2Continuing the trend started in last month’s first issue, writer Warren Ellis and artist Declan Shalvey offer another story where the themes dovetail into that of our main character but the crimes and villains of the piece take center stage. Moon Knight #2 focuses on the inner monologue of a screwed-over Special Forces soldier turned sniper looking for vengeance against those who he blames for his misfortunes.

Although given his own story Moon Knight would be likely to feel for the character, Ellis once again plays the story detached as the reader is given more information than the hero whose always complicated inner monologue has still yet to make an appearance.

Although it means we get a story where Moon Knight is only in about half the comic, the story works well. I’m enjoying the art of Shalvey, but I really dislike the new more functional (i.e. New 52ish) black-and-white costume (reminding me a bit of Eppy Thatcher as well) instead of the character’s traditional (i.e. way cooler) all-white garb. Worth a look.

[Marvel, $3.99]

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She-Hulk #3

by Alan Rapp on April 9, 2014

in Comics

She-Hulk #3What happens when the son of crazy dictator, who also happens to be the Fantastic Four‘s arch-enemy, shows up in your office looking for help getting away from his father? If you’re She-Hulk it means you’ve found your burgeoning new law firm’s first client.

Struggling to get Kristoff Vernard to the courthouse in time to argue for his right to asylum before the end of the day, She-Hulk faces the obstacle of a small army of Doombots standing between her client and possibly his last chance at breaking free of Doctor Doom‘s control.

Offering the same mix of action and courtroom drama, along with a good supply of both humor and action, She-Hulk #3 shows off Jennifer Walters’ impressive abilities although the day is far from won when Kristoff’s father shows up forcing an early end to the proceedings. I may still not be 100% sold on the the art of Javier Pulido, but there’s enough here to bring me back to see where the story goes from here. Worth a look.

[Marvel, $3.99]

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Legends of Red Sonja #5

by Alan Rapp on April 9, 2014

in Comics

Legends of Red Sonja #5The five-issue mini-series featuring a number of artists and writers offering various takes on the She-Devil with a Sword comes to a close as Red Sonja picks off another member of the Grey Riders in a tale by writer Blair Butler and former Secret Six artist Jim Calafiore and one more member of the band will fall to the tricks of a band of actors and thieves in a story by Kelly Sue DeConnick and artist Valentine De Landro.

From there Gail Simon and artist Jack Jadson bring the series to a close as Red Sonja, tired of playing games with the group out for her head, springs one final trap and teaches the remaining soldiers and mercenaries a deadly lesson about being careful about what they wish for.

Legends of Red Sonja #5 ends the mini-series a strong note (and unfortunate use of hero’s chain-mail bikini by one of the acting troupe). Those who have stayed with the series are rewarded, and for those who haven’t I would recommend looking out for the likelihood of a trade paperback collection in the near future. Worth a look.

[Dynamite Entertainment, $3.99]

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Fairest #25

by Alan Rapp on April 8, 2014

in Comics

Fairest #25After her stepsister is quickly dispatched by the timely arrival of Rama and Veruna, Cinderella returns to Fabletown along with her friends to report her findings to Snow White setting up next month’s conclusion of “Of Men and Mice” and the fallout between sisters that threatens to shake the Fable Universe to its core.

I enjoyed the latest issue of Fairest, even if I was surprised how quickly the issue dispensed with the threat of Cindy’s evil stepsister (but Veruna was pretty damn cool). Bringing in the feud between Snow White and Rose Red from the main Fables comic continues to blend the two titles more strongly together in what is sadly their final year of publication.

The uprising of the mice which ends the issue sets up next month’s conclusion to the arc, but its the few panels involving the return of the Fairy Godmother’s memory which adds a new wild card to both the end of this arc and the stories still left to be told. Worth a look.

[Vertigo, $2.99]

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G.I. JOE: Special Missions #13

by Alan Rapp on April 8, 2014

in Comics

G.I. JOE: Special Missions #13The conclusion of “Destro Must Die” isn’t much of a victory for anyone as Cobra and Destro lose their secret installation in Russia, the JOEs not only fail to capture their target but also loose Copperback as well, Destro earns the ire of Cobra Commander, the Special Mission team is captured by the Russian military, one member of the team gets left behind, and Copperback leaves disappointed without fulfilling her personal mission to kill Destro.

On their way home following some finagling of the diplomatic corps, the team leaves one member down as Beach Head will have to find a way to make his own way home, without their target, but are still able to halt the new B.A.T. experiments of Destro and Cobra.

After bringing her in, Helix isn’t given much do in the arc’s conclusion (but you can say the same for both Scarlett and Mainframe as well) in a very Destro-centeric issue. For fans.

[IDW, $3.99]

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Magneto #2

by Alan Rapp on April 7, 2014

in Comics

Magneto #2Following the clues left behind from the Omega Prime Sentinel who someone designed and left as a trap for those like him, Magneto travels to a tent city of the disenfranchised living in constant fear of some unknown agency which occasionally will kidnapping members of the group for their experiments.

The fear, hopelessness, and poverty of the tent city brings back memories of Magneto’s own childhood and the lessons he learned from the Nazis which the mutant puts to good use to get the answers he needs from the shadowy group that shows up one night seeking new laboratory rats for their anti-mutant experiments.

Writer Cullen Bunn and artist Gabriel Hernandez Walta weave a strong story balancing Magneto’s own past with his current circumstances reminding us where Magneto came from while demonstrating that the former super-villain may not have changed as much as Cyclops and the X-Men had hoped. Worth a look.

[Marvel, $3.99]

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