Television Reviews 

The Flash – Infantino Street

by Alan Rapp on May 17, 2017

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: The Flash – Infantino Street
  • wiki: link

The Flash - Infantino Street TV review

Despite Barry Allen‘s (Grant Gustin) initial belief that he could rewrite the future he glimpsed months ago, much of the Third Season of The Flash has had a hopeless vibe (so to speak). “Infantino Street” is the inevitable conclusion of these events. The day of Iris‘ (Candice Patton) death finally arrives, and despite bringing in Captain Cold (Wentworth Miller) for a theft inside A.R.G.U.S., the existence of the speed bazooka, and Barry refusing to learn too much about his friend’s plan to stop Savitar, he episode never sells us on the idea that Iris has any chance of walking out alive. Because of this the episode’s final scene is anti-climactic, especially after giving us the return of both Captain Cold and King Shark before seemingly going through the motions concerning the fate of Barry’s fiance.

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Supergirl – Resist

by Alan Rapp on May 17, 2017

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Supergirl – Resist
  • wiki: link

Supergirl - Resist television review

The war for National City has begun. The first-half of Supergirl‘s Second Season finale sees old faces return as Rhea‘s (Teri Hatcher) invasion of National City gets underway. Run out of the DEO, Kara (Melissa Benoist) and her friends are forced into hiding. The near death of President Olivia Marsdin (Lynda Carter) not only reveals her secret to the group but also offers the return of Cat Grant (Calista Flockhart) who stands tall providing a public distraction to give Supergirl the time needing to rescue Lena (Katie McGrath) and Mon-El (Chris Wood) from the Daxamite ship. To do so she’ll have to work alongside Lillian Luthor (Brenda Strong) in a makeshift peace destined for betrayal. By the end of the episode most of the plan has succeeded, but it turns out Rhea has one final surprise for Supergirl.

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Samurai Jack – Episode C

by Alan Rapp on May 16, 2017

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Samurai Jack – Episode C
  • wiki: link

Samurai Jack - Episode C television review

The penultimate episode of Samurai Jack brings Jack (Phil LaMarr) and Aku (Greg Baldwin) face-to-face for the first time in the show’s final season. Learning from Scaramouch (Tom Kenny) that Jack is without his magical sword, Aku shows up to interrupt Jack and Ashi (Tara Strong) to destroy the samurai once and for all. The disappointment that the samurai has retrieved his sword is short-lived, however, as Aku discovers a brand-new weapon of his own to use against Jack.

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Elementary – Scrambled

by Alan Rapp on May 16, 2017

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – Scrambled
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Scrambled television review

The death of Shinwell (Nelsan Ellis) spurs Watson (Lucy Liu) into taking up the man’s crusade. While suggesting a level of caution, and with far more mixed emotions towards the recently departed than what he knows what to do with, Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) proves equally up the challenge of the case although in his case he is distracted by a B-story which feels largely out-of-place shoehorned in here. One of the effects of having Holmes and Watson work for the police is they rarely choose their own cases. In this instance the episode is fueled by Joan’s need for retribution for Shinwell’s death which leads them to confront the apparent head of the gang and his upstanding brother who actually knows far more about its inter-workings than it appears.

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  • Title: Once Upon a Time – The Final Battle
  • wiki: link

Once Upon a Time - The Final Battle television review

Once Upon a Time closes out the show’s Sixth Season with a two-hour finale ominously entitled “The Final Battle.” While Snow (Ginnifer Goodwin), David (Josh Dallas), Hook (Colin O’Donoghue), and Regina (Lana Parrilla) awake in the Enchanted Forest, Henry (Jared Gilmore) remains in Storybrooke but things are slightly different than he remembers. Emma (Jennifer Morrison) is a mental patient, the Black Fairy (Jaime Murray) is the town’s mayor (and his adopted mother), and no one is interested in his tales of magic, curses, or fairy tales. Returning to the themes of the show’s first season, Emma’s “final battle” isn’t a war with magic or swords (okay, she will get to swordfight before all is said and done) but a battle for belief. At stake, should she falter, all the realms of story… including the one where her family remains trapped as the realms slowly go dark one by one.

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