Sherlock Holmes

Elementary – Sober Companions

by Alan Rapp on June 13, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – Sober Companions
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Sober Companions television review

Opening with the discovery of a murder victim which both hits close to home with the NYPD and also reveals that several other women all murdered by the same killer, “Sober Companions” brings two ongoing storylines to a head. The first involves Sherlock (Jonny Lee Miller) discovering Michael’s (Desmond Harrington) secret. And the second involves the detective pushing himself beyond the limitations of his medical condition in a futile attempt to catch a serial killer who has been two-steps ahead of him the entire season (and credits Sherlock’s words of wisdom about sobriety for much of his success).

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Elementary – Bits and Pieces

by Alan Rapp on May 31, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – Bits and Pieces
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Bits and Pieces TV review

For the first time this season Sherlock‘s (Jonny Lee Miller) condition interferes with an investigation as he discovers himself on the front steps of the brownstone with a severed head in in a bag and no memory of how he, or it, got there. This forces Holmes to share his condition with the NYPD. While its obvious Gregson (Aidan Quinn) would be upset that Holmes kept his condition hidden from the department for so long, I can’t say I’m wild about the show returning the pair to a more adversarial relationship (and Gregson’s complete, almost Holmesian, lack of empathy to his friend’s condition – which up until this point hasn’t interfered with a single case – unfortunately makes him come off like the bad guy in the situation). That said, the episode’s set-up is one of the more interesting of the series.

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Elementary – Our Time is Up

by Alan Rapp on May 23, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – Our Time is Up
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Our Time Is Up television review

While it appears we will need to wait at least one more week before Sherlock‘s (Jonny Lee Miller) condition has an effect on his performance as a consulting detective for the NYPD, the latest episode does continue to have some fun with the concept with the introduction of an old-school steampunk sensory deprivation chamber which Holmes will use multiple times over the course of the episode to help with his symptoms. Meanwhile, the murder of Watson‘s (Lucy Liu) old psychologist will lead the show’s other detective into considering a major life change.

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Elementary – Pushing Buttons

by Alan Rapp on May 16, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – Pushing Buttons
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Pushing Buttons television review

While the theme of Holmes‘ (Jonny Lee Miller) illness is present yet again, the main focus of “Pushing Buttons” involves the murder of Revolutionary War reenactor (and pyramid scheme creator) on the battlefield followed up by the arson of his home. As with many previous episodes of the series, Holmes and Watson (Lucy Liu) will work their way through suspects and various motives before finding the true reason for both crimes. This week’s reveal is almost too convoluted for its own good (hopefully not a sign of things to come). Given his condition, and his doctor’s prescription of rest, it would seem to be an interesting way to gear multiple episodes of the season towards Watson as the primary character, although that doesn’t seem to be what the writes have in mind.

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  • Title: Elementary – Once You’ve Ruled Out God
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Once You've Ruled Out God TV review

Murder by lightning gun turns Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) and Joan (Lucy Liu) on to a local laboratory missing some platinum, a dead Nazi bomb maker, and a legitimate threat of a dirty bomb being detonated in New York City. While the threat is very much real, the truth behind the series of events is never quite what it seems. The episode’s B-story involves more of Joan’s sister (Samantha Quan) and the death of her estranged and mentally-unstable biological father. While mostly filler, the B-story does feature a nice moment between the detectives which ties in Sherlock’s current illness with that of the father Joan barely knew.

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