Princess Mononoke

by Sarah on March 26, 2008

in Anime Reviews 

Don’t worry, I had seen Mononoke-hime, also commonly known as Princess Mononoke, back when I got introduced into the anime world, so I am not just watching it now.  I also know that it is a little over played on the review home front, and most everyone has seen this masterpiece, but I thought it would go nicely with the Spirited Away review I have planned for next week. 

Mononoke-hime
4 & 1/2 Stars

Don’t worry, I had seen Mononoke-hime, also commonly known as Princess Mononoke, back when I got introduced into the anime world, so I am not just watching it now.  I also know that it is a little over played on the review home front, and most everyone has seen this masterpiece, but I thought it would go nicely with the Spirited Away review I have planned for next week.  Another film by the same director, Hayao Miyazaki, is Howl’s Moving Castle.  Jeff, a fellow anime buff who used to do reviews along side me, reviewed it back in mid-January, but he didn’t enjoy it as much.

I don’t normally do the super popular animes, but let’s face it, Hayao Miyazaki is a genius in the anime world, so I have to cover them sometime.

 

Onto the anime, in this movie you follow the adventure of Ashitaka, the last prince of the Emishi people.  A gigantic rogue boar attacked Ashitaka; he survived the attack but was infected with a curse that would eventually kill him.  The villagers agreed there was nothing they could do for him and banished him in the middle of the night.  Banished with nowhere to go, Ashitaka searches for a cure for the curse on his arm left behind from the rogue boar.  The villagers of Irontown graciously take him in after he rescued a few of their men.

On Ashitaka’s first night in the village, San, the human daughter of the wolf goddess Moro, attacks the village.  She is attempting to assassinate Lady Eboshi, the leader of Irontown, in hopes it will drive the humans away from her home, the Sacred Forest.  San becomes injured and Ashitaka takes her to safety, but not before being injured himself.  From that point on, Ashitaka’s mission is to create peace between the humans and the animals.

A monk by the name of Jigo comes to town to team up with Lady Eboshi to sever the head of the Forest Spirit.  The Forest Spirit, also known as the god of life and death, is what the gods and goddesses of the forest, easily noticed because they are large, are there to protect.  In the end, the animals, even humans, all must work together to save the forest, and the rest of the world itself.

There is a love interest in this, but it isn’t sappy, which makes it okay.  The demons as they say are merely just rogue animals with blood oozing about.  Rather nasty, so hold off on the Ramen if you have a weak stomach, I do.  The Forest Spirit is a little trippy looking if you were expecting something different from a deer body and human-ish face that morphs night and day.  The story rocks, not if ands or buts about it.  Anyone who disagrees obviously has not been able to watch it several times without getting bored.  I don’t know of many animes that I have been able to watch more than twice, without getting bored of the story.  I cannot wait for Spirited Away next week, so check back if you are a fan of Hayao Miyazaki.

Previous post:

Next post: