Television Reviews 

  • Title: Supergirl – In Search of Lost Time
  • wiki: link

Supergirl - In Search of Lost Time TV review

The common theme of loss of control plays out in both storylines of “In Search of Lost Time.” M’yrnn‘s (Carl Lumbly) mental deterioration begins to effect those closest to him when the Martian’s mental exercises begin pushing out intensive emotional waves that turn DEO coworkers against each other and Suprgirl (Melissa Benoist) against Mon-El (Chris Wood). Speaking of Mon-El, the episode gives us the first look at his Legion super-hero suit (not too shabby) along with some cape training with Kara (which, while effective, still looks pretty damn goofy). Although the psychic blast pushes Kara into letting out some aggression on her former boyfriend, it also appears to have finally cleared the air between the two, and just in time because it appears the third Kryptonian threat has finally decided to make an appearance.

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Spenser: For Hire – Original Sin

by Alan Rapp on April 24, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Spenser: For Hire – Original Sin
  • IMDb: link

Spenser for Hire - Original Sin television review

For Throwback Tuesday we turn we turn our attention back to the mean streets of Boston. A pushy Catholic priest (Jay O. Sanders) guilts Spenser (Robert Urich) into investigating the death of a young girl who was about to become a nun. No one, includin the girl’s parents (Elizabeth Franz and Eddie Jones) and Spenser himself, wants him on the case which uncovers the fact that the young woman was pregnant and gets Spenser squared off against local scumbag Tommy Flaherty (David O’Brien) evicting people from property in dispute with ties to the archdiocese. Spenser’s run-in with Flaherty puts him temporarily at odds with Hawk (Avery Brooks), but his decision to save Spenser from a bullet shows where his friend’s loyalty’s truly lie (although, to be safe, Spenser does call in a favor to make sure Hawk is sidelined when it comes time to confront Flaherty).

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  • Title: Hawaii Five-0 – Ahuwale ka nane hūnā
  • wiki: link

Hawaii Five-0 - Ahuwale ka nane hūnā television review

Harry Langford (Chris Vance) returns to the islands working as protection for a British royal (Kate Beahan) and her teenage daughter (Alana Boden). When the daughter sneaks out of her protection detail, Steve (Alex O’Loughlin) and Danny (Scott Caan) help Harry track the girl down before the wrong type of people discover she’s unprotected on the island. Really just an excuse to get Vance back on the show, “I Ka Wa Ma Mua, I Ka Wa Ma Hope” is one of the more enjoyable episodes of the season with a nice balance of tension and humor. I smiled more than once when the show worked in Danny’s parenting skills of a precocious teenage daughter.

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Once Upon a Time – The Guardian

by Alan Rapp on April 23, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Once Upon a Time – The Guardian
  • wiki: link

Once Upon a Time - The Guardian television review

The death of Nick and disappearance of the Dark One dagger brings a bit of the old Rumpelstiltskin back as Weaver (Robert Carlyle) will threaten, steal, and betray to get his hands on his property. His discovery of the dagger’s whereabouts tie into the episode’s flashbacks involving Alice (Rose Reynolds) and a destiny Rumpelstiltskin first attempted, than thought better of, forcing on her many years ago. While the flashbacks lack zaniness of the old Dark One, the episode seems to suggest the troubled young woman is still tied to the dagger and may still yet have a role to play in Rumpelstiltskin’s salvation (or damnation).

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Arrow – The Dragon

by Alan Rapp on April 22, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Arrow – The Dragon
  • wiki: link

Arrow - The Dragon television review

It’s rare to get an episode that doesn’t center on Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell), but even rarer for one in which neither he nor his hooded alter-ego make an appearance (I’m not counting his cameo in the episode’s epilogue). Instead “Dragon” centers around Ricardo Diaz (Kirk Acevedo) and his quest to join a coalition of mafia families known as The Quadrant. Jerked around by the son (Ashton Holmes) of one of the organization’s four leaders, Diaz is forced to prove himself worthy of a meeting with the group. Despite holding up his end of the bargain in locating a Quardrant member in FBI custody, Diaz is betrayed. Diaz doesn’t like to be betrayed. I mean he really, really doesn’t like it.

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