Rick and Morty

  • Title: Rick and Morty – Rickdependence Spray
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Rick and Morty - Rickdependence Spray television review

Remember that time Morty‘s (Justin Roiland) masturbation nearly destroyed the world? Starting out with one of the most contrived setups in the show’s run, Morty discovers the joy’s of using the horse hospital’s horse breeding mount for his own sexual gratification just days before Rick (Roiland) plans to used borrowed horse semen to create a weapon to use against cannibalistic horse people known as Chuds (who have apparently being warring with humanity for some time… off-camera). Of course Morty’s DNA leads to complications and mutated monster sperm attacking humanity. Unaware of his grandson causing the failure of his experiment, Rick assumes his invention is to blame and easily coerces Morty into a fabricated lie involving “Space Sperm.”

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  • Title: Rick and Morty – A Rickconvenient Mort
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Rick and Morty - A Rickconvenient Mort television review

Remember that time Morty (Justin Roiland) fell in love with Captain Planet? That’s the basic idea of “A Rickconvenient Mort” when Morty falls for environmental super-hero Planetina (Alison Brie) who is brought forth by the not-so-teenage Tina-Teers using the four elemental rings to fight for the environment. Like all episodes dealing with Morty’s love life, things end poorly. The episode’s B-story features Rick (Roiland) replacing the absent Morty with Summer (Spencer Grammer) on a planet-hopping tour of three worlds all on the edge of annihilation.

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Rick and Morty – Mortyplicity

by Alan Rapp on July 7, 2021

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Rick and Morty – Mortyplicity
  • wiki: link

Rick and Morty - Mortyplicity television review

“Mortyplicity” is more of a bit taken to an absurd extreme than a fully fleshed-out story. The story stems from the fact that Rick (Justin Roiland) has cloned duplicates of the family to act as decoys for his enemies. However, believing themselves to be the real family, those clones have begun making clones of their own and attacking each other in a vicious loop to prove who is the “real” family. “Mortyplicity” certainly racks up the carnage as we see various families killed over, and over, and over again along with some odd style clones (including one set that appears to be wooden and clockwork). The fact the President doesn’t care about the deaths of Rick and Morty (Roiland) is a nice callback to his problems with the pair in previous episodes. The reveal that the “real” family is actually nowhere to be found during the carnage is confirmed in the epilogue.

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  • Title: Rick and Morty – Mort Dinner Rick Andre
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Rick and Morty - Mort Dinner Rick Andre

Rick and Morty kicks of it’s Fifth Season with an episode that introduces Rick‘s (Justin Roiland) arch-nemesis and prevents Morty (Roiland), once again, from getting romantic with Jessica (Kari Wahlgren). Crash landing in the ocean after their latest adventure forces Rick to deal with Mr. Nimbus (Dan Harmon) who rules Atlantis and the Earth’s oceans. Throwing a dinner party for his foe leads Rick to short-cuts including aging some wine on world where time moves differently causing no end of trouble for Morty when trying to retrieve the wine across decades while becoming the legendary scourge the other reality will come together to destroy.

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  • Title: Rick and Morty – The Vat of Acid Episode
  • wiki: link

Rick and Morty - The Vat of Acid Episode television review

Not that fans of the show need any further confirmation, but “The Vat of Acid Episode” certainly highlights was a ginormous prick Rick Sanchez (Justin Roiland) is. The entire episode centers around Rick inventing a device Morty (Roiland) has been constantly bugging him about, not as a favor to his grandson but as revenge for Morty slamming Rick’s (rather lame) plan in the episode’s opening that involves the pair hiding in a vat of fake acid from intergalactic gangsters to make it appear they have died. Along with Rick’s legendary dickishness, the other theme the episode plays on is introducing an in-depth, soul-crushing, plot thread for Morty that the show may or may not ever return to. For an episode based on a simple bit, this one really does have it all as events come full circle to reinforce Morty’s understanding of just what a bastard his grandfather truly is.

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