At Eternity’s Gate

by Alan Rapp on December 11, 2018

in Movie Reviews 

  • Title: At Eternity’s Gate
  • IMDb: link

At Eternity's Gate movie reviewThe latest from director Julian Schnabel takes us on a journey with Vincent van Gogh (Willem Dafoe) during the painter’s final years. Shot in Arles, Bouches-du-Rhône and Auvers-sur-Oise, France, where van Gogh lived during his final years, the film offers beautiful shots of the French countryside, countless close-ups of Dafoe’s face and paintings, and a somewhat unfocused narrative on the artist’s eccentric nature, loneliness, and view of the world.

The strength of Schnabel’s film is the look and style and its more silent moments centered around van Gogh where some of the magic of the artistic’s work is shown, but when the film moves from this to longer dialogues, often oddly filmed in extreme closeups, in attempts to explain van Gogh, the sequences are more hit-and-miss. Oscar Isaac as Paul Gauguin and Rupert Friend as Vincent’s brother lead a supporting cast of those moving in and out of the artist’s troubled life. Their scenes with Dafoe, and those involving a schoolteacher and unruly students, turn out to be the best of the sequences featuring Vincent interacting with others. But at its best, At Eternity’s Gate focuses on van Gogh’s interaction with nature and art, which to him were much the same thing.

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Comic Rack

by Alan Rapp on December 10, 2018

in Comics

Comic RackIt’s a new week so it must be time to talk about comics! Welcome back to the RazorFine Comic Rack boys and girls. Pull up a bean bag and take a seat at feet of the master as we offer you this quick list of all kinds of comic book goodness set to hit comic shops and bookstores this month from all your favorite publishers including DC, Marvel, Dark Horse, Archie, Dynamite, IDW, Image Comics, and others.

This week includes Avengers, Detective Comics, DuckTales, Fearscape, Hawkman, The Lone Ranger, Mage: The Hero Denied, Quantum Age, Robotech, Rose, Skyward, Spider-Gwen: Ghost-Spider, Supergirl, Superman, Uncanny X-Men, X-23, Zorro: Swords of Hell, the first issues of Batman: Who Laughs, Goddess Mode, The Land That Time Forgot, Miles Morales: Spider-Man, Planet of the Apes: The Simian Age, Spawn Kills Everyone Too, Team Mobile, Vampirella Vs Reanimator, and the final issues of Belle: Beast Hunter, Spider-Force, Spider-Girls, and War Bears.

Enjoy issue #241

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Asher

by Alan Rapp on December 7, 2018

in Movie Reviews 

  • Title: Asher
  • IMDb: link

Asher movie reviewWhile Asher doesn’t offer much in the way of surprise or suspense, there’s something magnetic about Ron Perlman as the career fixer whose age has finally started to catch up to him. Perlman captures Asher’s weary professionalism that is only ever disrupted by the chance meeting of a ballet teacher (Famke Janssen) whose life he literally falls into.

The script from first-time feature screenwriter Jay Zaretsky is pretty standard fare about an aging hitman whose life is about to get complicated by a new love and a past come back to haunt him. Perlman and Janssen help elevate the subject manner while director Michael Caton-Jones and cinematographer Denis Crossan combine to provide the film a visual style that highlights its stars and the world where Asher lives.

Filling out the story, the script throws in subplots involving Jacqueline Bisset the ballet teacher’s mother suffering from Alzheimer’s and troubles involving Richard Dreyfuss and Peter Facinelli as a honored boss and celebrity protege. Neither story offers easy answers, but, when force comes to bear, Asher will deal with all obstacles as best he can.

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Can You Ever Forgive Me?

by Alan Rapp on December 6, 2018

in Movie Reviews 

  • Title: Can You Ever Forgive Me?
  • IMDb: link

Can You Ever Forgive Me? movie reviewMelissa McCarthy stars as writer Lee Israel who resorted to forging documents from deceased authors and playwrights when her own career hit rock bottom. Can You Ever Forgive Me? has a couple of things going for it, the first being McCarthy. The dramatic role is quite a departure from McCarthy’s usual loud and obnoxious comedies. Although neither McCarthy nor the script (based on Israel’s own autobiography) can ever make the protagonist sympathetic, it is nice to see the actress take on a more serious role.

The second thing the film has going for it is Israel’s story. While forgery is quite common, hers was an unique tale showcasing the author’s hidden talent in crafting plausible fakes from literary’s best. Forgery by typewriter, however, does have a downside in that it isn’t very cinematic. Unlike movies about art forgery, Can You Ever Forgive Me? lacks great visuals to help sell the suckers (and the audience) on the con.

A common theme in films like this is the charming forger, who the audience begins to root for to succeed. That’s never an option here as McCarthy’s ball-busting portrayal is anything but sympathetic.

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Spenser: For Hire – Blood Money

by Alan Rapp on December 6, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Spenser: For Hire – Blood Money
  • IMDb: link

Spenser - Blood Money television review

For Throwback Thursday we turn we turn our attention back to the mean streets of Boston. Spenser (Robert Urich) gets involved in a kidnapping of a CEO (James Rebhorn) that makes less and less sense the longer he stays on the case. The radical group claiming responsibility doesn’t appear to actually exist. The company’s head of security (Jimmie Ray Weeks) botches the routine ransom drop, the company cares more about the stock price than their missing CEO, and Spenser’s client (Lonette McKee) has more to gain from her husband’s death than his safe return. When the CEO’s body is dumped, Spenser’s job may be done but that doesn’t mean he’s willing to leave things be.

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