Totally Under Control

by Alan Rapp on December 3, 2020

in Home Video

  • Title: Totally Under Control
  • IMDb: link

Totally Under Control movie reviewTotally Under Control is an indictment of President Donald Trump and the national mishandling of the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s both a chilling and enraging experience to have the months of inaction, series of missteps, casual disinterest, politicization of a health crisis, and frightening ineptitude chronicled with such precision. Interviewing medical professionals, scientists, and whistleblowers from within the CDC to Jared Kushner‘s volunteers, Totally Under Control highlights the many, many places where the United States went wrong in its policies towards COVID while comparing them to South Korea’s far more aggressive early measures which avoided the large death tolls continuing to rise in the United States.

One idea shared by directors Alex Gibney, Ophelia Harutyunyan, and Suzanne Hillinger is that every health crisis could have been handled better. However, the staggering failure of the United States with COVID runs the gamut from a President not willing to hear the truth, experts fired for telling the truth, and policies put in place making it harder to get life saving masks and drugs to medical professionals until Trump was able to personally profit.

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Silk Stalkings – Shock Jock

by Alan Rapp on December 3, 2020

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Silk Stalkings – Shock Jock
  • IMDb: link

Silk Stalkings - Shock Jock television review

Throwback Thursday takes us back to the unsolved crimes of passion in the wealthy playground of Palm Beach, Florida. Chris (Rob Estes) and Rita (Mitzi Kapture) investigate a sleazy radio host (Rodger Bumpass) who they both like for the murder of his longtime girlfriend (Rochelle Swanson) who was planning to leave him just as the shock jock hit it big. However, the man was on the air during the time of the killing. When an unstable caller (Marta DuBois) admits to the crime before committing suicide in prison, Donovan (William Anton) is ready to call the case closed, but Chris is unwilling to walk away even when it gets him in hot water and brings a harassment lawsuit against the department.

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Black Widow #4

by Alan Rapp on December 3, 2020

in Comics

Black Widow #4 comic reviewAfter failing to properly end their bizarre experiment, the villains behind Black Widow‘s fake life bicker on whether to run or fight. Neither option appears to have much success. Now in full command of her memory, Nat is able to piece together the truth about her family (which she still cares deeply for). She also knows if they are to have any hope of a future they will need to stay as far away from her as possible.

The comic brings back Yelena, Hawkeye, and Winter Soldier to help Natalia keep her family safe and give her time to figure out who is responsible. Things end poorly (or do they? in a comic about misdirection do we really know what we see?).

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Why Mulan Mattered

by Alan Rapp on December 3, 2020

in Essays 

Just Write compares the original Mulan with the live-action remake.

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A Call to Spy

by Alan Rapp on December 2, 2020

in Home Video

  • Title: A Call to Spy
  • IMDb: link

A Call to Spy movie reviewSet during WWII, Stana Katic stars as Vera Atkins charged with finding and recruiting women to be spies for the Special Operations Executive in order to obtain vital information in Nazi-controlled Europe. Trained in sabotage and subversion, the SOE’s agents are sent in to build spy networks and relay information back about the enemy.

Based on true events, A Call to Spy focuses on two of Vera’s recruits Virginia Hall (Sarah Megan Thomas), who would become known to the Germans as “the most dangerous of all Allied spies,” and Noor Inayat Khan (Radhika Apte) who became the first female wireless operator sent into occupied France.

A Call to Spy is an old school spy thriller about normal people standing up to do the extraordinary when called upon to serve a country that doesn’t value them as much as it should. Director Lydia Dean Pilcher and screenwriter Sarah Megan Thomas not only shed light on the women’s accomplishments but also highlight the sexism and racism they fought both abroad and at home by those questioning their loyalty and usefulness as part of the war effort.

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