Sherlock Holmes

Elementary – Reichenbach Falls

by Alan Rapp on August 13, 2019

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – Reichenbach Falls
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Reichenbach Falls television review

The penultimate episode of Elementary brings a close to the season-long arc involving billionaire vigilante Odin Reichenbach (James Frain). The deaths of Morland Holmes (John Noble), the professional criminals he used to commit the crime, and the detectives’ star witness against Reichenbach leave Sherlock (Jonny Lee Miller) and Watson (Lucy Liu) back at square one with no new plan on how to pick-up the fight. Holmes struggles with an outside-the-box solution for their foe, which, given his past, leads Watson to suspect her partner of taking the law into his own hands.

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Elementary – Unfriended

by Alan Rapp on August 5, 2019

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – Unfriended
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Unfriended television review

As the show moves one-step closer to the series finale, the focus remains on billionaire vigilante Odin Reichenbach (James Frain). Enlisting the help of his father, Sherlock (Jonny Lee Miller) begins a two-pronged attack against Reichenbach. As Holmes and Watson (Lucy Liu) work to track down another of Reichenbach’s killers (Kristen Bush), Morland Holmes (John Noble) uses the vast influence in the criminal organization in an attempt to cut the knees out from Reichenbach. Only one of these plans proves to be successful. The other will have tragic consequences.

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Elementary – The Latest Model

by Alan Rapp on July 29, 2019

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – The Latest Model
  • wiki: link

Elementary - The Latest Model television review

“The Latest Model” offers two cases for Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) and Watson (Lucy Liu). First, Odin Reichenbach (James Frain resurfaces with a case involving a potential killer. As he proposed to Holmes, he offers the detectives a chance to prove to the billionaire that his system isn’t correct in identifying and eliminating the man prior to his crime. The case here involves a podcaster (Roderick Hill) whose idea was stolen by a filmmaker who has turned it into fame and fortune while prolonging lawsuits to bankrupt the podcaster from ever seen a dime. As Reichenbach suggests, evidence does seem to point to the man committing crime that would injure both the guilty party and several bystanders. Holmes comes to an alternate solution to prevent the crime from occurring, and seems on the brink of pushing the billionaire into a less violent solution to the would-be criminals he identifies, but given the events at the end of the episode I’d say there is little chance for collaboration between Odin and the detectives (or any reason to suggest him changing his methods).

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Elementary – On the Scent

by Alan Rapp on July 19, 2019

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – On the Scent
  • wiki: link

Elementary - On the Scent television review

Beginning with the murder of artist, the NYPD believe a serial killer dormant for a decade has returned. Unable to connect any of the original victims to each other or the latest victim, Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) and Watson (Lucy Liu) begin looking for alternative reasons for the unknown killer’s DNA showing up at all five crime scenes. In the first of a series of twists, they discover the tainted samples for each crime are not from some mysterious killer but a worker in the DNA lab who unintentionally contaminated each of them. Looking at all five cases separately, all have obvious motives except for the most recent one… until they discover one of the woman’s dogs was taken as well.

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Holmes & Watson

by Alan Rapp on July 10, 2019

in DVD Reviews 

  • Title: Holmes & Watson
  • IMDb: link

Holmes & Watson Blu-ray reviewHolmes & Watson sets a new bar for the worst Sherlock Holmes adaption ever made. It’s likely it will keep that honor for several years, if not decades. Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly don’t so much play Sherlock Holmes and Dr. James Watson as reprise their roles from Step-Brothers playacting what they mistakenly believe 19th Century versions of the characters must have been like.

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