5 Razors

Young Justice #17

by Alan Rapp on August 11, 2020

in Comics

Young Justice #17 comic reviewI kinda love this issue. Taking place after the dust has cleared between the epic battle between the Justice League and the Legion of Doom we get a quiet standalone story featuring the League and Young Justice doing clean-up in Metropolis and teenager Yolanda Chan being bowled over at what she is witnessing.

There are some nice moments of camaraderie here as the Young Justice team continues to gel along with some sweet mentor/apprentice conversations between League members and the Young Justice heroes (the best of this involves Wonder Woman checking in with Wonder Girl and the Flash, thankfully minus all the extra crappy New 52 additions to his costume, catching up with Impulse at super-speed).

[click to continue…]

Black Cat #12

by Alan Rapp on August 11, 2020

in Comics

Black Cat #12 comic reviewBlack Cat versus Iron Man, ’nuff said. After stealing herself some Stark armor, Black Cat leads Iron Man across the city on a joyride filled with some fun banter and a solid twist that leaves old Shellhead shell shocked. It’s the perfect culmination to Felicia’s recent notable thefts.

Black Cat #12 is the best issue of the series. Sadly it’s also the final issue of the series. Despite being in the middle of the year-long arc of Felicia’s war with Odessa Drake and the Thieves Guild, Black Cat has apparently become a COVID casualty. Still, the story teased at the end of the issue, which would have appeared in Black Cat #12 featuring a fight with Queen Cat will apparently take place in the upcoming Black Cat: Queen in Black (although no word yet on Felicia’s war with the guild).

[click to continue…]

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #105

by Alan Rapp on July 6, 2020

in Comics

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #105 comicsBefore throwing the Turtles into the next big arc, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #105 offers an interlude for our heroes to grow, relax, reflect, and build on what they’ve learned since reuniting in New York. This quiet issue is full of wonderful small moments for several characters. While evil lurks on the periphery, it doesn’t intrude.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #105 offers a couple of long-overdue moments where my favorite of the characters created for this comic is concerned. First, Raphael finally lets down his guard and allows Alopex in. Second, Raphael, Donatello, Leonardo, and Michelangelo all welcome the arctic fox as an official member of the Splinter Clan.

[click to continue…]

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #104

by Alan Rapp on March 26, 2020

in Comics

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #104 comic reviewI loved this issue. After keeping the Turtles separate following the death of their father, they reunite in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #104 not to face some imminent threat but to finally share their grief with their loved ones. Donnie‘s trip to Mutant Town proves to be the catalyst needed to push Raphael and Donnie to returning to Leonardo and Michelangelo and tap into the strong family dynamic at the core of the title.

That alone would have been enough, but there’s plenty more story here as the Turtles together return to Mutant Town to set-up shop as protectors, mentors, and perhaps even senseis for a next generation of hero. There are some great moments among the foursome and with other characters including a nice back-and-forth between Alopex and Raph.

[click to continue…]

1917

by Alan Rapp on December 27, 2019

in Movie Reviews 

  • Title: 1917
  • IMDb: link

1917 movie reviewBased on actual events that occurred during World War I, 1917 follows two British soldiers (George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman) sent alone across enemy territory to warn of an impending ambush by the German Army. The script from director Sam Mendes and Krysty Wilson-Cairns strips down to the bare essentials avoiding obvious tropes and cliches from war movies to deliver one of the most memorable entries to the genre in recent years which was based on a story Mendes’ grandfather told him as a child. Exceptionally well shot by cinematographer Roger Deakins, 1917 is a movie of heroism, sacrifice, and survival that is marvelous to behold.

For a film about war, 1917 is a deceptively quiet film that builds tension between the moments of action (equally as memorable as its quite sequences) as our protagonists race to prevent more than 1,000 troops (including a brother) from walking into the enemy’s deadly trap while performing what appears to the British line as a hasty retreat. Along the way, Mendes sprinkles in supporting performances from the likes of Benedict Cumberbatch, Colin Firth, Mark Strong, and Richard Madden, but the film belongs to the two soldiers on their own past the German line on a suicide mission to deliver a message in time.

[click to continue…]