Doctor Who

  • Title: Doctor Who – The Girl Who Died / The Woman Who Lived
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Doctor Who - The Woman Who Lived

Another two-part episode brings The Doctor (Peter Capaldi) into contact with Vikings and thieves while introducing a new recurring character to the Whoverse we’re likely to see more of this season (and possibly beyond). “The Girl Who Died” takes The Doctor and Clara (Jenna Coleman) to a Viking village besieged by the advanced warriors of the Mire. Despite his reluctance at getting involved in the conflict, The Doctor is coerced to help both by the pleas of Clara and an uncomfortable feeling he gets when meeting Ashildr (Maisie Williams), a young Viking whose appearance (and death) will lead The Doctor to indulge in one of the most impassioned, and reckless, choices of this (or any regeneration).

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  • Title: Doctor Who – Under the Lake / Before the Flood
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Doctor Who - Before the Flood

The two-part episode featuring The Doctor (Peter Capaldi) and Clara (Jenna Coleman) fighting off ghosts in an underwater mining facility in the near future has a strong set-up and some intriguing ideas behind it’s premise even if it does eventually falter and stumble with the reveal of the truth about its ghosts and the reveal of the Fisher King (who looks like he walked straight out of incomplete costume fittings of the classic Doctor Who). Even if only partially successful, it’s still better thought-out bootstrap paradox than Looper.

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Doctor Who – The Witch’s Familiar

by Alan Rapp on September 29, 2015

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Doctor Who – The Witch’s Familiar
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Doctor Who - The Witch's Familiar

It’s official, I’ve already grown tired of Missy (Michelle Gomez). “The Witch’s Familiar” concludes the opening arc to the Ninth Season of Doctor Who which began with last week’s “The Magician’s Apprentice.” The not-so-dead Missy and Clara (Jenna Coleman) spend most of the episode together, and apart from The Doctor (Peter Capaldi) whose comapssion is put to the test by his most hated enemies and the mind of the mad man who spawned them. As Dalek episodes go I wouldn’t rank this pair against the best of Doctor Who, but the second-half does deliver The Doctor out-thinking his enemy once more (and surely not for the last time).

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  • Title: Doctor Who – The Magician’s Apprentice
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“If someone who knew the future pointed out a child to you and told you that that child would grow up totally evil to be a ruthless dictator who would destroy millions of lives could you then kill that child?”

Doctor Who - The Magician's Apprentice

Time travel is tricky. One of most commonly discussed issues with the ability to travel backwards it time and alter the future is the Hitler Paradox which debates both the morality and ability of killing someone before they grow into a fascist dictator with genocidal tendencies. The crux of that argument is at the heart of “The Magician’s Apprentice” opening with The Doctor (Peter Capaldi) naturally reaching out to help a scared child lost in the middle of a battlefield. However, learning the child’s name will force The Doctor to make an uncharacteristic decision which will bring the series full circle and cause The Doctor to return to face the creator of his most deadly adversaries one last time.

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Doctor Who – The Doctor’s Meditation

by Alan Rapp on September 20, 2015

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Doctor Who – The Doctor’s Meditation
  • wiki: link

Doctor Who - The Doctor's Meditation

Teasing the show’s Ninth Season premiere, “The Doctor’s Meditation” is a short six-minute episode that finds The Doctor (Peter Capaldi) in Camelot doing what he can to avoid confronting both an old adversary and one of the Time Lord’s least proud moments of all his 13 lifetimes. Sequestering himself for the purpose of meditation before the upcoming confrontation, The Doctor quickly wearies and finds ways to distract himself first by getting Bors (Daniel Hoffmann-Gill) and some of the other locals to dig several new (and faulty) wells near the castle and finally relenting to a retaliatory party to celebrate the Time Lord’s long life.

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