November 2008

This Week in Film

by Alan Rapp on November 24, 2008

in Film News & Trailers

  • Title: Four Christmases
  • IMDB: link

Reese Witherspoon and Vince Vaughn star as a married couple forced to hit four different X-Mas Day family celebrations.  Robert Duvall, Mary Steenburgen, Jon Favreau, Kristin Chenowith, Dwight Yoakam, Sissy Spacek, Katy Mixon, Tim McGraw, and Stephanie Venditto also star.  We’ve seen it and we’ll have the review when the ho-ho-ho’s begin everywhere on Wednesday.

This Week in Film

by Alan Rapp on November 24, 2008

in Film News & Trailers

  • Title: Transporter 3
  • IMDB: link

Jason Statham returns as Frank Martin in the third chapter of the franchise.  This time he’s asked to deliver a Ukrainian official’s kidnapped daughter (Natalya Rudakova) to Odessa.  Robert Knepper, Francois Berleand, Justin Rogers Hall, Eriq Ebouaney, and David Atrakchi also star.  We’ve seen it and we’ll have the review when the mayhem begins everywhere on Wednesday.

Bolt

by Alan Rapp on November 21, 2008

in Movie Reviews 

  • Title: Bolt
  • IMDB: link

“If I stare at the lock long enough it will burst into flames.”
“Now I’m concerned on a number of levels.”

It’s been quite awhile since I’ve used the word impressed to describe a Disney animated film.  Bolt proves two things: 1) Disney bringing Pixar into the fold was a very smart move and is starting to bear fruit, and 2) the Magic Kingdom may still have a little fairy dust left after all.  Bolt is one of the most pleasant surprises of the year.

Bolt (John Travolta) is a super-dog whose powers include laserbeams which shoot out of his eyes and a super-bark which can take out an entire army of Dr. Calico’s (Malcom McDowell) evil agents.  There’s just one thing, none of it is real.

Bolt is the star of a television show and believes the special effects done during the scenes are his own doing.  When the script calls for his owner Penny (Miley Cyrus) to be abducted Bolt breaks out of the studio and finds himself in a world which he is ill-prepared for.

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The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

by Alan Rapp on November 21, 2008

in Movie Reviews 

  • Title: The Boy in the Striped Pajamas
  • IMDB: link

The lens of childhood innocence is a powerful method to shine light on many subjects.  In The Boy in the Striped Pajamas the son of a Concentration Commandant befriends a young Jew in the “farm” next door.  As events slowly unfold young Bruno (Asa Butterfield) discovers the world isn’t the simple place he once believed.

Bruno is a normal 8 year-old boy with a loving mother (Vera Farmiga), a protective older sister (Amber Beattie), and a father (David Thewlis) who he is proud of.  Oh, did I forget to mention that the film is set in Germany during WWII and Bruno’s father is an SS officer?

When his father takes a promotion the family moves from Berlin to a fortified house in the country, near what Bruno takes for a farm filled with strange people in striped pajamas.  When he inquires about the new neighbors Bruno is ordered to stay far away, which, for a inquisitive, curious 8 year-old, is the perfect temptation.

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Twilight

by December Lambeth on November 21, 2008

in Movie Reviews 

  • Title: Twilight
  • IMDB: link

Capturing the sparkle of a diamond in the rough Twilight accomplishes its destiny. Twilight is a film to be reckoned with amongst teenage girls and fans of the novel series; even though it is not great, I would say it’s handsome nonetheless. The film itself is awkward and lacking a bit of finesse, but isn’t a monstrosity.

Twilight pulls on the uncomfortable realities in moving to a new school, state for that matter, and making new friends. It captures the awkwardness of first love and peaks our interests with a new perspective and persona for a vampire, a vegan vampire. No sharp pointy fangs, no spattering of blood and a complete lack of conformity for monster like features and going up in flames.

The film jumps from what could have been this generation’s The Lost Boys and moves into a better attempt at supernatural love and teenage interest than Blood and Chocolate or The Covenant.

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