May 2018

Elementary – Bits and Pieces

by Alan Rapp on May 31, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – Bits and Pieces
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Bits and Pieces TV review

For the first time this season Sherlock‘s (Jonny Lee Miller) condition interferes with an investigation as he discovers himself on the front steps of the brownstone with a severed head in in a bag and no memory of how he, or it, got there. This forces Holmes to share his condition with the NYPD. While its obvious Gregson (Aidan Quinn) would be upset that Holmes kept his condition hidden from the department for so long, I can’t say I’m wild about the show returning the pair to a more adversarial relationship (and Gregson’s complete, almost Holmesian, lack of empathy to his friend’s condition – which up until this point hasn’t interfered with a single case – unfortunately makes him come off like the bad guy in the situation). That said, the episode’s set-up is one of the more interesting of the series.

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Invincible Iron Man #600

by Alan Rapp on May 31, 2018

in Comics

Iron Man #600 comic reviewThe final comic from Brian Michael Bendis for Marvel before moving to DC is something of a mess. Featuring a number of different artists and a plot that seems to condense about six months worth of story all into a single issue, Iron Man #600 announces the return of Tony Stark to the Marvel Universe. Not satisfied with one miracle, Tony also brings back another friend from the dead with him.

The issue also includes Riri Williams, along with other heroes like Miles Morales, getting recruiting into a super-secret S.H.I.E.L.D. like agency whose members include vampires by Leonardo da Vinci. Oh, and Tony’s parents are alive and his father has been working for Hydra for years. Okay…

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  • Title: Supergirl – Dark Side of the Moon
  • wiki: link

Supergirl - Dark Side of the Moon television review

Searching for substance that can separate Reign (Odette Annable) from Sam leads Kara (Melissa Benoist) and Mon-El (Chris Wood) to an asteroid that isn’t an asteroid at all. What they find is the Kryptonian city of Argo floating in space thanks to the use of the very same material they need to stop Reign. The season finally offers a payoff to the show recasting Kara’s mother as Supergirl encounters Alura Zor-El (Erica Durance) alive and well on Argo. Despite the citizens needing the precious material to stay safe in space, Alura and Kara argue decisively for a sample to save the Earth. Kara meeting the council also answers the question to just who is behind Reign’s creation, although only for the audience.

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  • Title: The Toys That Made Us – Star Trek
  • IMDb: link

The Toys That Made Us - Star Trek

While the other episodes of the documentary series look at the phenomenally successful toy lines that defined a generation (or several generations), the Star Trek episode is an interesting departure that focuses far more on the franchise’s mistakes, false starts, stumbles, and decades of poor marketing that led to frustration from their target audience. While there are some interesting items here and there, and the quality did improve in later years, the stand-outs here are the toys that either failed (such as the constantly beeping walkie-talkie tricorder) or the bizarre (what exactly is that flashing helmet for?). Of the three episodes I’ve watched from the show’s Second Season, it’s the most interesting allowing collectors and toy makers to celebrate and bemoan the byzantine ups and downs of Star Trek merchandise.

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Deception – Code Act

by Alan Rapp on May 30, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Deception – Code Act
  • wiki: link

Deception - Code Act television review

The Mystery Woman’s (Stephanie Corneliussen) quest, and her connection to the Black family is revealed in “Code Act” as she successfully pulls a bank heist under the nose of the Amazing Cameron Black (Jack Cutmore-Scott) and the FBI searching for the final piece of her puzzle. It appears, along with being a horrible father and renown magician, Cameron and Jonathan’s father (Jack Davenport) was also a thief who used the cover of the stage shows to help steal millions all over the globe. And, for decades, those millions have been hidden away behind an elaborate set-up that requires a very specific set of artifacts to open.

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