Elementary – Just a Regular Irregular

by Alan Rapp on November 14, 2014

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Elementary – Just a Regular Irregular
  • wiki: link

Elementary - Just a Regular Irregular

While continuing to develop Kitty‘s (Ophelia Lovibond) relationships to both Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) and Watson (Lucy Liu), “Just a Regular Irregular” returns Rich Sommer as often-shirtless mathematician Harlan Emple who stumbles upon a dead body while playing a complicated mathematical game. When others involved in the game start turning up dead as well, Holmes and Watson agree to work together to piece together a motive for the crimes which are being committed a dedicated killer obsessed with hunting down an anonymous math blogger who is threatening the man’s livelihood.

While presenting a murder mystery with a well-disguised motive, the events of “Just a Regular Irregular” also seem to imply that Kitty isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. Sherlock’s protege once again stumbles upon an important clue leading to the capture of a murderer and her choice to acknowledge Holmes and Watson’s combined concern for counseling for the aftereffects of her violent past further illustrates her willingness to compromise in order to receive the tutelage from both detectives whom she is smart enough to realize she needs. We even get Watson and Kitty working together a bit on their own case for the first time.

Sommer’s return and the bizarre mathematical game killing spree reminds us of the number of people Holmes relies on to complete his work. Holmes makes a point to even naming his “Irregulars” to Captain Gregson (Aidan Quinn) while standing up for Emple who he knows isn’t responsible for the crimes. Holmes’ relationship with Emple is a bit more complicated, but his return to ease the pain he inadvertently caused on a man whose expertise he relies continues to show a growth in the character. Holmes may not be Emple’s friend but he does put forth an that the detective we met in the show’s First Season would have scoffed at. The episode’s goofy attempt at CBS cross-programming works better than it should as we learn a valuable lesson never to get involved in a competition with Phil Simms where knives are involved.

Previous post:

Next post: