August 2018

  • Title: Charlie’s Angels – The Mexican Connection
  • wiki: link

Charlie's Angels - The Mexican Connection TV review

Today’s Throwback Tuesday takes us back to the tale of three beautiful former police detectives turned private detectives working for a faceless boss known as Charlie. Looking into a crashed plane, the Angels take on case involving drug smuggling over the Mexican border and a brewing drug war that brought the plane down. Sabrina (Kate Jackson goes in undercover as a stewardess and Jill (Farrah Fawcett) as the new swim coach for the daughter of local drug lord (Cesare Danova). Kelly (Jaclyn Smith) enters the scene as a schoolteacher on holiday who catches the drug kingpin’s eye enabling all three to insinuate themselves into the man’s life.

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The Happytime Murders

by Alan Rapp on August 23, 2018

in Movie Reviews 

  • Title: The Happytime Murders
  • IMDb: link

The Happytime Murders movie reviewAfter being in and out of development for the better part of a decade (delays included a legal battle with Sesame Street), The Happytime Murders finally has made its way to theaters. Directed by Jim Henson‘s son Brian Henson, the film is juvenile, crude, and certainly lacking in likable characters. That said, it also made me laugh, and (perhaps most importantly) it never bored me.

The story takes place in a world where living puppets are commonplace, although most humans treat them as second-class citizens. In the style of a gumshoe film noir, our lead is surly puppet detective Phil Philips (Bill Barretta) who gets drawn into a series of murders that tie back to a popular television show involving his friends and family.

For good measure, the film adds a classic femme fatale (Dorien Davies) and Phil’s gruff, but honest, narration as he works through the case. (I almost wish it had been made in black and white.) The investigation also brings Phil back together with his former partner (Melissa McCarthy) whose testimony got him thrown off the police force years before.

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Patrick (H) Willems examines Hollywood’s problems with public domain characters like Robin Hood and King Arthur. Interesting points, but, say what you want, I like Fuqua’s King Arthur.

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Danger Man – The Prisoner

by Alan Rapp on August 21, 2018

in Television Reviews 

  • Title: Danger Man – The Prisoner
  • wiki: link

Danger Man - The Prisoner television review

Our Throwback Thursday post takes us back into the Cold War spycraft of Danger Man. There’s a lot happening in “The Prisoner” as Drake (Patrick McGoohan) first needs to find a suitable double to stand in for an American citizen (William Sylvester) confined the U.S. Embassy in the Caribbean for five long years. Stepping out the embassy would mean the man’s death at the hands of a brutal colonel (William Lucas) and a president (Michael Peake) all too eager to earn a big victory over the West. Drake finds such a double in a famous pianist, and former soldier, who agrees to help despite the danger he will certainly be putting himself in.

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Archie Meets Batman ’66 #2

by Alan Rapp on August 21, 2018

in Comics

Archie Meets Batman '66 #2 comic reviewWith Batman‘s most fearsome villains (the Joker, Catwoman, the Riddler, the Penguin, and others) relocating to Riverdale for easier pickings, the Dark Knight Detective sends Robin and Batgirl in undercover as transfer students to Riverdale High. Meanwhile the villains, confounded by the sheer number of teenagers in the small town, set to recruiting new henchmen and discover there are some bad apples everywhere, even in Riverdale.

The mashup of the the 60s Batman TV-series and the pre-Riverdale gang provides all kinds of fun as the tones of both mesh perfectly.

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